Tips for Providing a Balanced Meal to your Pet

The diet provided to your pet should be a balanced one, meaning it meets all the nutritional requirements.

Diets prepared at home include a variety of foods which are fed at different times. Just the way humans eat, if your pets are provided everything they need over a week or two, their diet will turn out to be complete as well as balanced.

In fact, the same approach is followed by us when feeding our families.

In other words, just as humans need variation in their diet, the same must be followed in case of dogs. Thus, so long as your pet does not suffer from health problems which require a specific diet to be fed, you can always try some variations.

You must remember that puppies are more susceptible to problems arising from nutritional deficiencies when compared to adult dogs.

A few guidelines need to be followed when feeding cooked or raw diet to dogs, a few of which are as follows –

To begin with, any single type of food (be it chicken or anything else) should not make up more than half of the dietary intake. Unless stated expressly, food being fed can either be cooked or raw. If you are providing leftovers, it needs to be ensured that they are not fatty in nature.

Meat and Animal Products:

Such foods should always make up nearly half of the diet. It needs to be understood that a number of raw diets are high in fat which can lead to obesity with regular consumption. On the other hand, if the amount of fat is too restricted, your dog might suffer from a deficiency of the required nutrients.

The best option here is to provide lean meats, i.e. meat that has, at the most, 10% fat- remove the skin from poultry and cut off separable fat.

Fish:

Fish is a great source of vitamin D. Canned fish with bones such as sardines which are packed in water, pink salmon and jack mackerel are considered to be good choices. However, raw Pacific salmon trout and related species should never be fed. Fish can be fed in small portions every day or in larger amounts twice a week.

Leafy Green and Non-Starchy Vegetables:

The best part about these is that they are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity. However, too much can cause gas and raw vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function. They should thus be cooked if fed in large amounts.

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